Category Archives: Spirituality

Prayer for Protection

Copyright 2008 by R.O. & R.A. Robbins
Copyright 2008 by R.O. & R.A. Robbins

Prayer for Protection is a poem written by Unity minister James Dillet Freeman for all soldiers during World War II.  It was also carried into space by astronaut Buzz Aldrin on the first manned moon landing in 1969.

Individuals and churches use this beloved prayer as a reminder that wherever we go, God is.  Often the words “and all is well” are added to the end.

I did not grow up with “canned prayers” but I find the words of the Prayer for Protection extremely helpful and comforting, especially during times when words just won’t come.  If you are not familiar with the Prayer for Protection visit one of the links below and get acquainted.

The words may be found at http://www.embracehumanity.com/prayer-at-common-ground/prayer-for-protection/ and an audio visual meditation version may be found at http://content.unity.org/prayer/guidedMeditations/prayerForProtection.html

 

Thought for Today

English: Three candles lit for the three first...
English: Three candles lit for the three first Sundays of advent. Svenska: Adventsljusstake med tre brinnande ljus. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The season of Advent means there is something on the horizon the likes of which we have never seen before… What is possible is to not see it, to miss it, to turn just as it brushes past you. And you begin to grasp what it was you missed, like Moses in the cleft of the rock, watching God’s [back] fade in the distance. So stay. Sit. Linger. Tarry. Ponder. Wait. Behold. Wonder. There will be time enough for running. For rushing. For worrying. For pushing. For now, stay. Wait. Something is on the horizon.” — Jan L. Richardson, Night Visions: Searching the Shadows of Advent and Christmas

Thought for Today

Hanukkah
Hanukkah (Photo credit: Itzike)

“At this time of year, when the sun is most hidden, the holiday of Hanukkah celebrates the rays of hope and light.  Indeed, the physical darkness of this time of year can be a metaphor for the darkness that often envelops us at times of illness and loss of a loved one, when the world sometimes feels dark and cold.  At such times, we yearn for the sun, and the light and warmth that it provides.  Often it is through simple and unrecognized miracles that we are able to feel the warmth of hope and light.”Rabbi Rafael Goldstein